• This topic has 3 replies, 3 voices, and was last updated 3 years ago by Anonymous.
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    • #13597
      1WickedLush
      Participant

      Premium Content | Through the Eyes of a husDOM™

      Lots of us are into bondage around here, which is great. Some of us are rather new at it, which is cool, too.

      But how many of you/us have quick-rescue hardware should something go wrong? Probably not enough, and I’d bet that those of us who DO don’t have it close enough at hand. That’s the point of this post.

      For a little background, I was a Boy Scout in my youth, a Boy Scout Leader in my son’s youth, and I hold an EMT license in Illinois and Wisconsin. I’ve also taught First Aid and CPR (Infant, child, adult, and “For the professional rescuer”) for the American Red Cross and the American Safety and Health Institute. I have also provided first aid service for many medieval reenactments in the SCA over the past 15 years, with people in full steel plate armor and women wearing full Elizabethan dresses including multiple petticoats and historically accurate and appropriate corsets. I’m also mostly ready for the zombie apocalypse.

      Let me tell you, after helping my wife and daughters get into Elizabethan garb, I can say with only a small amount of off-color humor, that rape didn’t likely happen in that time period, because there was no way to get under those dresses quickly! And a proper corset? Like body armor.

      Seriously, though, my experience and training has taught me that there are a couple of tools that every rigger should have in his pocket or on his belt when the ropes come out. The first, most useful for thinner ropes, paracord, and scarves, is a “rescue hook” style seatbelt cutter. The one that I have attached by Velcro loop to the handle of my bag is a Benchmade “7 Hook” which retails for about $40 from Benchmade. The other one is a good pair of EMT shears. The ones that I carry most often is a pair of “Rip Shears” with ripper which retail for about $30 or so on Amazon. Rip Shears has recently come out with a “mini” size, but I have the original larger size.

      Both of these cutting instruments are designed and marketed to the emergency services community, where fast and effective removal of restrictive clothing and such can be the difference between life and death. The EMT/trauma shears are fantastic getting through basically anything that is thicker than the hook knife can get through, which is the main reason that I prefer to have both on hand… Belt and suspenders, if you get my drift.

      There are also a number of lock blade knives on the market that include a hook blade somewhere. Sometimes it is at the opposite end from the knife blade, sometimes (like the StatGear knives) the hook blade and the knife blade are in the same end, and sometimes *shudder* the hook is on the back of the knife blade itself. In my opinion, this is the absolutely WORST configuration, because it puts the cutting blade into contact with the rope bunny while you’re trying to get her to safety.

      The Benchmade rescue hooks (there are several varieties) and the folding hook knives are much safer and offer a lot in the way of control, but they are most effective on small diameter rope/line and scarves or clothing (heh heh heh). EMT/trauma shearscan cut through firefighters’ insulated turnout gear, carpet, pennies, multiple thicknesses of denim, etc. Thickness is much less of an issue for shears than the hook knife.

      When the ropes come out, you might be comfortable leaving your rescue implements in your bag. Me? On my person, thank you. When shit goes pear-shaped, the first thing on my mind is getting the bunny to safety, and if I have to dig through my bag, that’s a delay. Pockets or belt holsters are much easier to find in a play party.

    • #13600
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      Great post. Paramedic shears were my first purchase even before the rope.

      • #13602
        1WickedLush
        Participant

        Premium Content | Through the Eyes of a husDOM™

        Good on ya, Tex! And with their cost being so inexpensive (for the most part) you can really afford to buy a bunch of them and sprinkle them around the play space.

    • #19023
      Anonymous
      Inactive

      I keep a Leatherman Raptor handy for that very reason – it has the seatbelt cutter and paramedic shears. It is pricey though.

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